Share

Snowboards

Salomon Sick Stick 2018-2019 Splitboard Review

We’ve always had a soft spot for the Salomon Sick Stick, especially since its Wolle Nyvelt-inspired reamp last year. Its backcountry freestyle chops have long been lauded, so it stands to reason that the splitboard version is one of the finest examples we’ve ever seen.

The Salomon Sick Stick splitboard is available in two sizes rather than the original’s three, but the short ‘n’ fat version wouldn’t make a good touring board anyway. The 157 and the 162 both sail very close to the specs of the solid equivalent, with just a couple of key weaks in areas such as waist width.

“If you enjoy spines and drops as well as chutes, then this is the real deal”

Getting all set for the way up couldn’t be easier; the Salomon Sick Stick Split comes pre-packaged with its own bespoke skins, which attach to the nose via a hook-and-hole system, and to the tail with an elastic clip in a notch. Also found on the Salomon Premiere, it’s a terrific system – and one that splitboard newbies will delight in.

Thanks to the impressive clips licensed from Plum splitboards, reverting to riding mode at the top is quick and easy, and the whole setup feels reassuringly solid once you’re ready to go. At that point, there’s nothing else for it but to enjoy all the benefits of the Sick Stick’s shape and construction on the way down.

“Reverting to riding mode at the top is quick and easy, and the whole setup feels reassuringly solid once you’re ready to go”

The mildly tapered shape makes staying afloat a breeze, as does the shape of the nose and tail, but this actually rides a lot more like a twin than you’d think. Indeed, if you’ve no interest in freestyle then there are plenty of other boards to check out – but if you enjoy spines and drops as well as chutes, then this is the real deal.

Lightweight and not too stiff, with a mostly-cambered profile offering up oodles of pop, the Salomon Sick Stick splitboard will ensure you make the most of any natural features you find.

Tester’s Verdict

Ed Leigh

“I don’t like riding long splitboards. Too often the extra length means a lot of movement between clips and bindings, so it feels like you’re riding two bits of overcooked spaghetti held together with staples.

So I was looking forward to trying a 157 out. On the way up it felt great; having ridden the normal Salomon Sick Stick 157 I knew it was stiff, so the touring was easy. The skis never washed out on traverses even when it got hard and steep.

“I was so impressed with this board and the way it rode – not just in powder, but in the less glamorous snow as well”

The skins supplied with the board are brilliant, the front hooks and rear elastic fasteners both very easy to use. I imagine they’re difficult/expensive to replace, but as standard issue they are very impressive.

The real test for all splitboards, though, is the descent. I will put up with any number of touring issues if a snowboard is good in riding mode, and on this front the Sick Stick delivers.

The biggest attribute for me are the Plum clips. As I mentioned before, it’s a short board, and when you add in these wide-surface-area clips you get a very solid feel from the board. I was so impressed with this board and the way it rode – not just in powder, but in the less glamorous snow as well. 10 out of 10 from me.”

Share

Newsletter Terms & Conditions

Please enter your email so we can keep you updated with news, features and the latest offers. If you are not interested you can unsubscribe at any time. We will never sell your data and you'll only get messages from us and our partners whose products and services we think you'll enjoy.

Read our full Privacy Policy as well as Terms & Conditions.

production