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Bindings

Flow Fenix 2019-2020 Snowboard Bindings Review

  • Sizes: M, L, XL
  • Flex: 5
  • Entry System: Rear Entry
  • Price: £200/€220
  • BUY ONLINE

Making its debut this season the Flow Fenix is the top end of the new Axis series and is chock full of new tech and is raring to make its mark on the binding world.

In keeping with Flow’s custom, the Fenix is a rear entry binding, with the ability to be used like a traditional binding if the mood should strike you. Using Flow’s Active Strap Tech, it eradicates the problem of having to loosen the strap in order to get your foot in securely, as the highback opens, the foot strap moves up slightly.

“The baseplate also takes on an asymmetric shape the entry point of the binding is slightly wider for ease of use”

The baseplate is slightly rockered, in order to reduce the overall footprint size of the binding and to allow for a more natural flex. The baseplate also takes on an asymmetric shape- the entry point of the binding is slightly wider for ease of use.

Flow have taken note that the vast majority of people ride with their bindings at an angle and have thus offset the attachment points for their power cables to line up better with the middle of your board.

The Fenix is a high quality, mid-flexing binding that’s designed to save you time whilst strapping in but will also save your wallet a wee beating as well.

Tester’s Verdict

Rob McCreathWhitelines

“I had a bit of a shocker on the NX2 (which I put down to my own lack of experience with Flow bindings as much as anything else), so was somewhat wary about screwing another set onto my board.

I’m happy to say that – though I’m still not a convert to the whole rear entry system – I got on way better with these things.

I put it down to two reasons. Firstly, use the straps! Loosen them off a little when you’re stepping in and out and then really crank them up tight once the highback is snapped shut. Trying to wiggle your foot in and out otherwise just creates problems and wastes time.

The second reason is that these felt like a softer, less aggressive option, but actually suited my riding style much better. It was a slushy spring day, I was out lapping Tignes’ legendary Palafour sidehits and once I got moving the Fenix bindings felt quite similar to most mid-flexing freestyle bindings.

“Flow bindings really tuck your boot in nice and securely. Once you get them fastened up there’s very little room for movement and none of the annoyances faced with conventional bindings of toe straps sliding loose”

Flow bindings really tuck your boot in nice and securely. Once you get them fastened up there’s very little room for movement and none of the annoyances faced with conventional bindings of toe straps sliding loose. This was especially noticeable given the conditions I was riding in. If there’s one thing to work a binding loose, it’s jibbing around in the slush. Nothing to report here, though. I was securely fastened at the bottom of the run as I was at the top.

I’ve got to say, I’m nowhere close to considering buying a pair of Flow bindings just yet, but if I was, the Fenix would probably be my starting point. A really solid allrounder and with a pretty nifty price point.”

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