• Price: £410 / €480
  • Sizes: 151, 154, 156, 159
  • Flex: 5
  • Profile: Camber
  • Shape: True Twin

Last year Lobster released the first version of this snowboard, under the name of the ’Special Random Addition.’ Despite being thin on the ground, it gained high praise from those who rode it, and so here it is reborn and renamed as part of the brand’s official line: the Lobster Floater.

The chief influence for the Lobster Floater is undoubtedly the Magic Carpet, made by sister brand Bataleon.

It shares the same powder-centric-twin focus, including a rarely-seen version of Triple Base Technology (that’s where a flat channel of base from nose to tail is flanked by raised side sections).

This base is of a far more pronounced convex nature at each end, vastly improving the floatation of what would otherwise be too short a nose to really trust in the powder.

This has been further improved with the new ‘Sidekick’ contact points, which are slightly raised - something you’ll also notice when initiating turns on the piste, as well as in the powder.

"This base vastly improves the floatation of what would otherwise be too short a nose to really trust in the powder"

Indeed, the Lobster Floater isn’t just for deep days; if it hasn’t dumped for a while, the twin shape and wide waist mean that laying down heavy carves and hitting natural features (or even those in the park) are fine alternatives. Some of the best days you could have on this could well be in the late-season slush.

"What the Lobster Floater does, it does exceedingly well, and it’s easy to see why it’s getting a wider release in 2017/18"

Naturally it won’t have the same high-speed cruise-control qualities of a bona fide directional charger, or the pop and manoeuvrability of a pure park board, but it has enough to make do, and then some. The base is a durable sintered version that will let you feel the G’s, providing you have the skill to hold your line.

It has the same core as the Magic Carpet - a poplar construction strengthened along each edge by bamboo - but is lighter on additives. It’s cheaper as a result, and you’d struggle to find anything lacking performance-wise in the Lobster Floater.

What the Lobster Floater does, it does exceedingly well, and it’s easy to see why it’s getting a wider release in 2017/18. It won’t be for everyone, but it’ll be right up the street of riders who love to throw shapes in the pow.

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Sam McMahon

Tester's Verdict

Sam McMahon - whitelines.com

“Powder and jibbing - the best two things in snowboarding. Whilst there are tons of boards that’ll just about let you do both, there are few that truly excel in that sweet spot.

The Lobster Floater is one of them, though. It’s a true twin, and with that comes a twin powder triple base, letting you skim over pow fields like it’s nothing, whatever your stance.

"If you’re into building backcountry booters or bonking trees, buttering and boosting, there’s not many boards out there that’ll match this one"

Increasing the width rather than the length gives you much more of a jibby feel even in powder compared to more freeride tuned boards, and all the while it begs to be thrown off cat tracks and spun off drops.

Neither is it as stiff as a two-by-four; the bamboo core keeps things playful whilst allowing you to get super-pressed when you’re dicking about with butters.

That much playfulness does come at a cost - take it on the piste or through the park and you’ll lose some control points with 3BT that wide, as it can wash out if you’re not careful. However, if you’re into building backcountry booters or bonking trees, buttering and boosting, there’s not many boards out there that’ll match this one in terms of pure off-piste fun factor."

Trade Secrets

Halldor Helgason - Co-owner, Lobster

"The Floater started out as a Random Addition but we liked it so much we decided to keep it in the line for another year.

It’s still pretty random, but it’s so damn fun."

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