• Price: £135-215 / €159-259
  • Frame/Lens: Night Camo Collection / Prizm Torch Iridium

If you’re looking to maximise your peripheral vision on the mountain, then you might be tempted to opt for a ‘frameless’ design which tends to be more expensive. Before you go splurging, take a look at the Oakley Line Miner snowboard goggles.

"A low-profile design that performs just as well as some far more expensive rivals"

The cylindrical frame of the Oakley Line Miner has been designed to sit very close to your face, thus making sure the frame that surrounds it doesn’t interfere with your spectrum. The result is a low-profile design that performs as well as some far more expensive rivals.

Ventilation and anti-fogging are both delivered well here, with Oakley’s bountiful eyewear experience on full display. For best results, use a Prizm lens. The claims of increased contrast and clarity aren’t just marketing spiel; seeing clearly on the mountain has never been easier.

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If you’re wondering about helmet compatibility, the answers can be found at the pinnacle of halfpipe riding. Chloe Kim runs the strap underneath her helmet, while Scotty James chooses to wear it over the top. It’s all about your own preference, but if you opt for the latter then you can trust the three silicon grips on the inside of the strap to keep it from slipping.

"The Oakley Line Miner is brilliant... It’s easy to see why so many of snowboarding’s biggest names put their trust in it"

Another option for those willing to swap a bit more cash for convenience is the Prizm Inferno system, exclusive to the Line Miner. A lightweight strap-mounted battery pack heats your lens in 3-minute cycles, which you trigger with a simple push of a button.

At the first sign of potential fogging, the Inferno will prevent the problem before it has a chance to bed in, all without affecting your own temperature. It’s not cheap, though; if you were wondering why the price range of the Oakley Line Miner varies so much, there’s your answer.

Even if you don’t go for the tech upgrade, the Oakley Line Miner is brilliant, especially for the price. It’s easy to see why so many of snowboarding’s biggest names put their trust in it.

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Tester's Verdict

Andrew Duthie - whitelines.com

“I usually prefer ‘frameless’ goggles with a spherical lens over the alternative, as there’s no need to take the chance when it comes to peripheral vision (especially if you have a fairly large head, as I do). However, the Oakley Line Miner stood out for me this year as a memorable exception to the rule.

"Having the lens so close to your face is really great; you feel less like you’re in a goldfish bowl"

Having the lens so close to your face is really great; you feel less like you’re in a goldfish bowl, and a bit more ‘present’, if that doesn’t sound too much like hippie bollocks. And because it uses Prizm lenses, you get truly incredible definition. The competitors are getting closer, but for my money it’s still the lens tech to beat.

There’s zero distortion, zero fogging, zero discomfort and zero reasons not to consider the Line Miner as your next pair of goggles.

I didn’t try the Inferno system0 and don’t imagine I’d have much use for it, but if you get really pissed off by fogging and don’t want to take any chances, then it might be a worthwhile investment."

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