The Electric EGX snowboard goggle is the only frameless lens in the brand’s range to feature a cylindrical model. A bigger, taller design ensures that much of the face is covered, which is especially handy if your head is a bit on the large side.

Thanks to the shape and the lack of visible frame, peripheral vision is more than sufficient. Venting is taken care of along the top of the Electric EGX, so there’s no need to have any on the front of the lens - a definite bonus for frameless designs like this one.

"A bigger, taller design ensures that much of the face is covered, which is especially handy if your head is a bit on the large side"

The EGX features Electric’s ‘Press Seal Technology’ lens-changing system. Our tester had a little trouble with it compared to some other systems on the market (see below for more on that), but it’s not lagging so far behind as to make it a non-starter. More convenient systems will set you back a lot more cash, so the Electric EGX offers a good compromise.

There are 11 different versions of the Elecrtic EGX from which to choose, most of which feature a take on Electric’s new ‘Brose’ high-quality lenses. Anyone looking for this style of goggle will also be thrilled by the performance and price tag, so you really can’t lose.

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Tester's Verdict

Ed Blomfield - whitelines.com

“Let’s not beat around the bush, I’ve got a big melon! The huge lenses of the EGX are therefore ideal; they fit nicely around my head and turn even moon-faced folk like me into a trendy Chuckbuddy.

In terms of peripheral vision, I’ve yet to find a more impressive goggle – whether you peer side-to-side or top-to-bottom there is literally no foam encroachment, and of course no sign of any frames since there aren’t any. It’s like looking through a giant window.

Changing lens is less of a positive experience – the EGX requires you to press carefully into a rubber slot that runs around the edge. It’s a definite technique – a bit like sealing an oversized ziplock bag – and impossible to do without leaving thumbprints about. You can polish them after, of course, but compared to the quick release designs elsewhere on the market it’s a pain. That’s the price you pay for such a clean-looking design.

"In terms of peripheral vision, I’ve yet to find a more impressive goggle – whether you peer side-to-side or top-to-bottom there is literally no foam encroachment"

I have ridden these for several weeks and despite boasting few visible vents they very rarely fog – perhaps the larger design naturally allows more air to circulate. Vision wise, the new ‘Brose’ lenses – a combination of bronze and rose – are clearly a response to Oakley’s Prizm technology. They offer excellent definition in most conditions, though to my eyes they were not quite as impressively crisp as the Oakleys.

As with all rimless designs, the lenses on the EGX are more prone to scratches, particularly when they’re dropped. My advice? Steer clear of the highly mirrored options and choose one of the more durable dark tints for sunshine, plus Electric’s excellent yellow low-light number."

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