Whitelines-Snowboard-Outerwear-Guide-2014-2015

The trends have come and gone (as Illicit helpfully explains here), but these days there are so many options that it’s never been easier to find the right gear. Always remember, though, that even the most badass-looking jacket/pant combo is only as good as its performance on the hill. That’s not to say that there’s a minimum quality that your togs must meet; as with the rest of your gear, the trick is to strike the right balance based on what you’re likely to be doing. Low-spec kit could send you the way of Captain Scott if the conditions get harsh, but an expensive down jacket won’t be much good when hiking a park rail in the spring. Figure out what’s worth pulling off the rack by considering the following points:

Fit: Most brands still offer plenty of options in this department, from 90s-style baggy to jib-kid skinny and everything in-between. You may have to consult the brands’ catalogues or websites to see exactly what they mean by ‘relaxed’, ‘street’ or ‘classic’ fit, but this won’t be too hard to get your head round with a little research.

Waterproofing: The short answer to this one is ‘the higher the number, the better it’ll keep the water out’. However, there’s a bit more to it than that. What the number represents is the height in millilitres of the column of water that can be stacked on the fabric before seeping through to the other side is observed. If there’s a name where the number should be, that refers to a patented material that doesn’t follow the standard scale. The most common of these is Gore-Tex, found on high-performance gear.

Breathability: Again, a big number equals better performance. This time the rating tells you how much moisture is able to escape from through the fabric, and represents the grams of liquid that pass through per square centimetre in a 24-hour period. Simply put, if the sweat you work up can’t go anywhere, it clings to you. This is never fun, especially in colder weather where you really need your skin to stay dry, so good breathability is just as important as good waterproofing.

Insulation: Normally it’s pretty bleedin’ cold when you’re snowboarding, and being suitably wrapped up should be at the top of your priority list. Most jackets have built-in insulation that ranges from light padding to thick down. Others are often just a thin shell that, while keeping you dry, won’t necessarily keep you warm. These are preferable in springtime, though, and you can always wear layers underneath it to give you full control of your temperature.

Taping: As garments are constructed out of different pieces of fabric sewn together, something’s got to be done to ensure that no water seeps through where they join. ‘Critical’ taping applies extra waterproof material to the seams most prone to wear, tear and contact with the snow, whilst full taping puts it everywhere. Naturally, items featuring the latter tend to cost more.

Vents: Usually found under the armpit or on the inside thigh, these are areas of mesh fabric that can be zipped open to increase air flow when required. They’re not necessary, but certainly make it easier to regulate your temperature in varying conditions.

Other features: Common ones that crop up are powder skirts (an elasticated waistband that prevents snow getting in under the jacket), boot gaiters (the same tech applied to the bottom of pant legs), stash pockets, headphone loops and detachable hoods. The brands dream up new things every year, so keep an eye out for what’s on offer in 2014/15.

Scroll through the outfits using your left and right keyboard cursor keys, or click on each name to jump straight to the review of that particular brand.

686

adidas

Analog

Bataleon

Billabong

Bonfire

Burton

Colour Wear

DaKine

Lib Tech

Nike

Nikita

O'Neill

Oakley

Patagonia

Protest

Quiksilver

Ride

Thirty Two

Volcom

686-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Michael Akira West was only 20 years old when he started 686. Still independent and rider-owned after more than twenty years, the brand continues to put out eye-catching apparel that takes its inspiration from LA street culture. It's found favour with a wide variety of riders from Louie Vito up in the pipe to Forest Bailey down in the streets, and their in-house tech such as the Smarty 3-in-1 detachable layering system has earned several industry plaudits. Bizarrely, 686 outerwear recently collaborated with the cast of Alaska-based reality TV show Deadliest Catch. If it’s good enough for grizzled deep-sea crab fisherman, chances are it’s good enough for you.

686.com

LEFT:

Parklan Sasha Insulated Jacket (Women’s)

£200

15,000MM

10,000GM

Parklan Meadow Pant (Women’s)

£185

15,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

GLCR Peak 3-Ply Jacket (Men’s)

£330

20,000MM

15,000GM

GLCR Arc 3-Ply Pant (Men’s)

£250

20,000MM

15,000GM

Adidas-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015-2

If this is adidas outerwear’s “difficult second album" after last year’s successful launch, they’re not showing it. Their upcoming line is bold and colourful, with far more emphasis on colour than the initial run. Less prevalent is the famous three stripes down the arm and leg, although some models (including the Firebird one-piece suit and, unsurprisingly, the 3 Stripe jacket) have retained them. With the 2 Minute Warning model seen here, they’ve aped an old ice hockey design from the adidas archives while still giving it all the tech specs you’d want from a snowboarding jacket. If you were more a fan of the understated back-and-white stuff from last season, fear not: there’s still plenty of that available in the range too.

adidas.com/snowboarding

LEFT:

Access 2L Jacket (Women’s)

£200

10,000MM

10,000GM

Run The Snow Strech Pant (Women’s)

£150

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

2 Minute Warning Jacket (Men’s)

£190

10,000MM

10,000GM

Multapor Pant (Men’s)

£140

10,000MM

10,000GM

Analog-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

While part of Burton, Analog has its own reputation for outerwear and a disctinct style – you’re never likely to get the two confused. Analog is definitely more in tune with current fashion trends – why else would they have a jacket called the Shoreditch? – and produces several top quality pieces in which you’d be just as happy walking to your local boozer as you would be on a mountain. Once you factor in the various bells and whistles under the serface, though, it’s clear that this is a world apart from the stuff made by your average streetwear brand. It’s always worth having a look at the Analog range; more often than not, other brands take their lead from them.

analogclothing.com

LEFT:

Desolate Jacket (Men’s)

£250

15,000MM

10,000GM

Anthem Pant (Men’s)

£160

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Solitary Jacket (Men’s)

£220

15,000MM

10,000GM

Anthem Pant (Men’s)

£160

10,000MM

10,000GM

Bataleon-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Bataleon is still best known for its range of snowboards and the Triple Base Technology they feature, but the brand has also established itself in the outerwear world. The guys have achieved that rare thing of making items with low-key designs that are still instantly recognisable; not unlike the boards they make. As for features, the popular Helmet Hoodini (a hood big enough to fit your lid under) is back again, as are the elastic cords that allow you to hike up the bottom of your pants when walking. It’s still very much quality over quantity – what you see here is almost the entire range – but Bataleon also makes lighter pieces for the warmer months such as the Hektor hoodie.

bataleon.com

LEFT:

Balder Jacket (Men’s)

£250

10,000MM

10,000GM

Midas Pant (Men’s)

£180

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Dora Jacket (Men’s)

£250

10,000MM

10,000GM

Lima Pant (Men’s)

£160

10,000MM

10,000GM

Billabong-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

The first of a few brands in this guide that have a surf pedigree, Billabong has been in business since way back in 1973. Surfing’s popularity boom in the ‘90s allowed the company to expand into other areas, one of which was snowboarding. Nowadays it continues to make quality shred gear, some of it inspired by our brothers and sisters in the water. Rather than just sponsoring rider, Billabong gets its pro team wired right in to the process; the items pictured below were designed by Olympic slopestyle champ Jamie Anderson and all-round powerhouse Bode Merrill. Another thing worth noting is the price – it’s not often you see 15,000ml waterproofing and 15,000g breathability in a jacket costing less than £200!

billabong.com

LEFT:

Bode Jacket (Men’s)

£190

15,000MM

15,000GM

Merrill Pant (Men’s)

£160

15,000MM

15,000GM

RIGHT:

Jamie Jacket (Women’s)

£185

15,000MM

15,000GM

J.A. Pant (Women’s)

£124

15,000MM

15,000GM

Bonfire-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Bonfire reaches a landmark this year, with a full quarter-century of snowboard outerwear production under its belt. Oregon-based founder Brad Steward’s bedroom start-up is now one of the most respected names in the business, with an admirable track record of making high-quality durable snowboard gear that doesn’t break the bank. It’s now owned by Salomon, but continues to operate as its own beast. Their range is handily broken down into Platinum, Gold and Silver collections, so it’s easy to find the gear with the right specs for you. Here’s to another 25 years.

bonfiresnowboarding.com

LEFT:

Madison Jacket (Women’s)

£190

15,000MM

10,000GM

Remy Pant (Women’s)

£130

10,000MM

8,000GM

RIGHT:

Arc Jacket

£190

15,000MM

10,000GM

Arc Pant

£140

15,000MM

10,000GM

Burton-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

You might think it’s a cakewalk being the biggest brand around, but in snowboarding that’s a reputation you have to re-earn at the start of every new winter. Burton knows this better than anyone, and continues to tick all the boxes after almost four decades in business. By now some of its outerwear subcategories are so widely known that they could be brands themselves – there’s the [ak] range (aimed at big-mountain pow-chasers), and The White Collection (designed by Shaun) to name just two. Overall, there’s no way someone perusing the B’s catalogue won’t find anything that suits them – the range is utterly comprehensive. Burton isn’t dragging its heels when it comes to sustainability, either, with some of the range boasting fabrics that have been made from recycled Mountain Dew bottles.

burton.com

LEFT:

Brighton Jacket (Women’s)

£170

10,000MM

10,000GM

Southside Pant (Men’s)

£170

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Frontier Jacket (Men’s)

£190

10,000MM

10,000GM

[ak] 2L Swash Pant (Men’s)

£270

Gore Tex

Colour-Wear-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Colour Wear (also known as CLWR) has been putting out their wares since the start of the decade, and is more popular than ever. The blend of performance and fashion has caught on in a big way and reaches far beyond its native Sweden, with Scottish rider Jamie Trinder among those turning out in CLWR togs. The range is split into four categories: Liberty, Fusion, Ride and Urban. Which one you’ll want to pick your gear from depends on the kind of riding you like to do, as well as your preferred style. Liberty jackets like the Falk are built to withstand shithouse conditions, while the Up Parka sits in the street-fashion-inspired Fusion range. They do a nice line in off-the-hill apparel too.

clwr.com

LEFT:

Up Parka (Women’s)

£190

10,000MM

10,000GM

WTTR Pant (Women’s)

£145

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Falk Jacket (Men’s)

£290

20,000MM

20,000GM

Falk Pant (Men’s)

£220

20,000MM

20,000GM

Da-Kine-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

DaKine has its roots in Hawaii, where the name traditionally means “the best", and they’ve spent the last 35 years living up to that title across several sports. Their snowboard gear is found on the likes of Leanne Pelosi and Elias Elhardt, given the quality of their backcountry-specific items. Indeed, the selection you see here is Gore-Tex all the way. They also make less technical (and therefore cheaper) jackets and pants too, as well as an impressive range of gloves and backpacks. What’s more, DaKine abides by Social Accountability International’s ‘SA8000’ standards, which works to ensure workplace standards are met at every stage of the supply chain.

dakine.com/snowboard

LEFT:

Quinn Jacket (Women’s)

£300

Gore-Tex

Riley Pant (Women’s)

£250

Gore-Tex

RIGHT:

Logan Jacket (Men’s)

£300

Gore-Tex

Dryline Pant (Men’s)

£310

Gore-Tex

Lib-Tech-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Perhaps still best known for being at the forefront of the rocker revolution with their Skate Banana snowboard, the guys at Lib Tech make great clothing too. After taking a year off, its outerwear range is back with a bang and has something to suit any rider’s preference. However, the company’s appeal has always been in their willingness to roll the dice on some more offbeat designs, and we’re pleased to report that there’s plenty of that on show as well. One of the more noteworthy pieces for 2014/15 is the Totally Down sack (pictured), which is basically a sleeping bag that connects to the jacket of the same name. That’s definitely one to consider if you’re planning some overnight splitboard missions.

lib-tech.com

LEFT:

Totally Down Jacket (Men’s)

£260

15,000MM

15,000GM

Totally Down Sack (Men’s)

£75

15,000MM

15,000GM

RIGHT:

Wayne Jacket (Men’s)

£275

20,000MM

20,000GM

Wayne Pant (Men’s)

£210

20,000MM

20,000GM

Nike-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Nike’s involvement in snowboarding was initially met with suspicion, but the sports giant soon put paid to that thanks to their focus on quality. Having one of the best pro teams on the planet (Nicolas Müller, Sage Kotsenburg, Annie Boulanger, Jamie Nicholls and Silje Norendal to name just a few) hasn’t hurt either. The selection seen here is aimed at the all-rounder who’s after the specs that will keep them cosy on the hill, but the overall range has gear to suit everything from windswept Alaskan peaks to streetrail sessions. With over half a century of experience, you know Nike isn’t messing around.

nikesnowboarding.com

LEFT:

Hudson Parka Jacket (Women’s)

£250

10,000MM

10,000GM

Willowbrook Pant (Women’s)

£170

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Kampai 2.0 Jacket (Men’s)

£180

10,000MM

10,000GM

Ruskin Pant (Men’s)

£148

10,000MM

10,000GM

Nikita-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

What is a girl to do when she can’t find any suitable snowboard clothing? ‘Make it yourself’ was the response of Iceland’s Heida Birgisdottir. She started Nikita back in 2000 after six years of designing and manufacturing female-specific togs for her and her friends. Obviously the vast majority of brands have now developed female lines but even as the rest of the field has caught up, Nikita remain among those who do it best. After fourteen years they’re still a top choice for ladies who want serious gear for serious shredding; look out for their snowboards, boots and bindings as well.

nikitaclothing.com

LEFT:

Amberfield Jacket (Women’s)

£250

10,000MM

8,000GM

Penrose Pant (Women’s)

£140

10,000MM

8,000GM

RIGHT:

Mayon Jacket (Women’s)

£220

10,000MM

8,000GM

Klif Pant (Women’s)

£180

20,000MM

5,000GM

O'Neill-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Given that Jack O’Neill first set up shop in 1952, his company is the oldest of all those that feature in this guide. Over half a century later it’s still very much a surf brand but now also throws its weight behind big-mountain Jeremy Jones and Quebecois twosome Max Parrot and Seb Toots. Recently it’s given UK snowboarding a shot in the arm too, sponsoring Andy Nudds and Matt McCormick as well as organising the Shoreditch Showdown rail jam. Among the most interesting pieces in the 2014/15 range are pro jackets for Jones and Toots (the latter pictured here), and a colab with Pendleton Woollen Mills.

oneill.com

LEFT:

Seb Toots Signature Jacket (Men’s)

£250

15,000MM

10,000GM

Stereo Pant (Men’s)

£150

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Icebreaker Anorak (Men’s)

£150

8,000MM

8,000GM

Zen Pant (Women’s)

£150

15,000MM

10,000GM

Oakley-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Oakley will probably always be best known for its top quality eyewear, whether it’s on the face of Terje Haakonsen, Bubba Watson or Bradley Wiggins. However, they don’t slouch when it comes to apparel. The brand has always favoured bold designs, co-created and backed by one of the most comprehensive pro teams on the planet. Take the Nighthawk Biozone outfit (pictured below), designed by Olympic silver medallist and fan favourite Stale Sandbech. That word ‘Biozone’ crops up a lot in the range; it’s Oakley’s unique moisture management and insulation system that’s tailored to maximise comfort without too much bulk. If it’s top performance you’re after, certain pieces – such as Jake Blauvelt’s signature gear – have a Gore-Tex finish.

oakley.com/snowboard

LEFT:

Nighthawk Biozone Jacket (Men’s)

£265

15,000MM

15,000GM

Nighthawk Biozone Pants (Men’s)

£220

15,000MM

15,000GM

RIGHT:

10-4 Insulated Jacket (Women’s)

£220

15,000MM

15,000GM

Gretchen Bleiler PRS November Insulated Pant (Women’s)

£265

20,000MM

20,000GM

Patagonia-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

‘Powslayer’. ‘Untracked’. ‘Powder Bowl’. The award for the most Ronseal-named outerwear collection definitely goes to Patagonia. The Californain company’s gear is predominantly aimed at the high-end freerider who needs kit that can pass muster in some of the most harrowing conditions on the planet. Yes, the price is higher than that of the average snowboard outfit, but you’ll feel the benefit of spending that extra wedge as soon as you put it on –and should you get stuck in a storm, it’ll pay for itself several times over. Knowing that the brand invests a significant amount of that cash into environmental and sustainability causes also takes the sting off. Truly remarkable outerwear.

patagonia.com

LEFT:

Powslayer Jacket (Women’s)

£540

Gore-Tex

Powslayer Bibs (Women’s)

£460

Gore-Tex

RIGHT:

Untracked Jacket (Men’s)

£420

Gore-Tex

Untracked Pants (Men’s)

£330

Gore-Tex

Protest-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Our mountains here in Britain may not be the Matterhorn, but at least we’ve got some, unlike the poor folk of Holland. Still, that hasn’t stopped Dutch brand Protest from making a name for itself in the shred community. Its output has traditionally been about bright one-colour pieces like those seen here, but there’s plenty of pattered stuff in the line too. Some of their gear, such as the Denys pant pictured below, has lower waterproofing specs so isn’t suited to extreme conditions, but is ideal for the novice who wants something cheap to get going with at their local dome. Protest even calls itself “a leader in basics", a claim that it more than lives up to.

protest.eu

LEFT:

Heywood Jacket (Women’s)

£150

10,000MM

10,000GM

Redworth Pant (Women’s)

£100

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Taku Jacket (Men’s)

£170

10,000MM

10,000GM

Denys Pant (Men’s)

£80

5,000MM

5,000GM

Quiksilver-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Quiksilver may have started life as a surf brand but, as its logo helpfully communicates, it pays just as much attention to the mountains as it does to the water. Travis Rice is their talisman, and the Wyoming-based demigod has designed a whole range of outerwear and accessories for 2014/15 – look out for his unique logo adorned on certain pieces this year. Alongside his picks are the Black, Premium and Utility collections, so there’s something for everyone here. Well, every man anyway – sister brand Roxy makes female-specific kit to the same high standards, and is well worth checking out too.

quiksilver.com/snow

LEFT:

Mission Jacket (Men’s)

£210

10,000MM

10,000GM

Lincoln Pant (Men’s)

£135

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Polar Pillow Jacket (Men’s)

£290

15,000MM

15,000GM

Dark And Stormy Pant (Men’s)

£165

15,000MM

15,000GM

Ride-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Ride started selling snowboards in 1993, and launched Cappel outerwear the following year. These days Cappel still exists, and retains its own unique style, but Ride releases jackets and pants under its own name too. The 2014/15 line is another strong one, with what seems like a fit and colour scheme for very conceivable preference; some jackets come in as many as six different designs, and there’s a ‘Tall Boy Fit’ aimed at the lankier rider. It’s interesting to note that a lot of the range, including everything you see here, has higher waterproof specs than breathability ones. However, both the men’s and women’s ranges go right up to some 20K/20K fully-taped beasts that can withstand some the worst conditions Mother Nature can throw at you.

ridesnowboards.com

LEFT:

Marion Jacket (Women’s)

£190

10,000MM

5,000GM

Belmont Pant (Women’s)

£175

15,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Georgetown Jacket (Men’s)

£220

15,000MM

10,000GM

Belltown Pant (Men’s)

£180

15,000MM

10,000GM

Thirty-Two-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Thirty Two will always be a snowboard boot specialist, but that’s not to say its outerwear isn’t worth a look too. As becomes apparent when you look at the team (JP Walker, Dylan Alito, Joe Sexton and Frank April among them), the products are aimed at the park/urban crowd far more than at beardy mountain men. The Sesh jacket, for instance, has lower specs and a styling that wouldn’t look out of place in a Videograss movie. However, there’s also some full 20K/20K kit for those who want to be able to brave the icy peaks as well as the streets. It’s a solid line, especially when you include the hoodies, beanies, balaclavas and even socks that also come courtesy of Thirty Two.

thirtytwo.com

LEFT:

Sesh Jacket (Men’s)

£165

8,000MM

8,000GM

Wooderson Pant (Men’s)

£150

10,000MM

10,000GM

RIGHT:

Blythe Jacket (Men’s)

£200

10,000MM

10,000GM

Basement Pant (Men’s)

£135

8,000MM

8,000GM

Volcom-Snowboard-Outerwear-2014-2015

Volcom is one of those brands that does skate, snow and surf equally well – if you need proof, check out their recent video masterpiece True To This. Its mountain gear doesn’t really have a niche, as the range goes from low-spec right up to full Gore-Tex, but it certainly has a style that’s helped it garner huge loyalty from customers. They’re not alone; legends Terje Haakonsen, Jamie Lynn and Bryan Iguchi are all still repping ‘the stone’ after all these years too. Volcom can produce low-key pieces as good as the next brand, but where it really excels is with those unique, eye-catching garments that you won’t find anywhere else. Case in point: the Patch jacket, pictured below.

volcom.com

LEFT:

Astrid Jacket (Women’s)

£340

Gore-Tex

Merlin Pant (Women’s)

£250

Gore-Tex

RIGHT:

Patch Jacket (Men’s)

£170

8,000 MM

3,000 GM

Rain Bib (Men’s)

£300

Gore-Tex

Want more gear? Check out our top outerwear picks from the 2013/14 season here.