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Memphis-N9690-Ninja-Ice-Gloves

Buying a pair of gloves might be an afterthought for some people, but having the right ones for the job can make or break a day’s riding. There are, of course, different types of gloves for different needs. As we gallop into spring, it’s good to have a pair of ‘pipe’ style gloves handy, ones that keep your hands warm enough to ride without cooking them in bulky, sweat-filled mitts. That’s not to undermine the importance of having a quality pair of winter gloves, mind you. There’s no point having great outerwear if you can’t keep your hands warm – just ask Sir Ranulph Fiennes. Save yourself an unpleasant encounter with a fretsaw by packing the right finger-clothes; here are a few we looked at to get you on your way:

[part title="Oakley - Factory Winter Mitt"]

oakley-factory-winter-mitt-snowboard-gloves

OAKLEY FACTORY WINTER MITT

Price: £80

Style: Mitten

oakley.com

Pros: With Gore Tex and a sofa showroom’s worth of leather, these offer more protection than David Duchovny’s glass case thing in Zoolander. There’s more freedom of movement in this than in your average mitt, and the fit at the wrist is nice and snug.

Cons: Good God, are these things warm. Obviously that’s a good thing when you need it, but we wouldn’t recommend these for milder climates. It’s quite a wedne to pay, too.

[part title="Celtek - Trippin Pro Mitt"]

celtek-trippin-pro-mittens-snowboard-gloves

CELTEK TRIPPIN PRO MITT

Price: £75

Style: Trigger

celtek.com

Pros: This upgraded version of the Trippin features waterproof zips at the wrist, allowing for easy customisation of fit. The palms feature goat leather that offers a bit more grip, and comes in a range of colourways designed by the pros (the one shown here is Gigi Rüf’s).

Cons: It’s got quite a loose feel to it, which won’t be for everyone. And while that Bemberg fleece lining is perfectly comfortable, it wasn’t one of the better ones in this bunch.

[part title="Park - X Whitelines Frag Pipe Glove"]

park-whitelines-pipe-snowboard-gloves

PARK X WHITELINES FRAG PIPE GLOVE

Price: £37

Style: Pipe

wearepark.co.uk

Pros: Aside from the obvious benefit of repping your favourite snowboard mag while on the slopes, these offer just the right amount of snugness without suffocating your hands. They’re decked out with extra-grippy palms and a snot-wiper – and if you pick these up, you’re buying British.

Cons: Don’t, whatever you do, consider these if you’re looking for a glove to wear on your January trip to Whistler. As with all pipe gloves, they’re best suited to slushy spring sessions or glaciers in summer.

[part title="Grenade - DK Trigger Mitt"]

grenade-dk-mittens-snowboard-gloves

GRENADE DK TRIGGER MITT

Price: £53

Style: Trigger

grenadegloves.com

Pros: Grenade head honcho Danny Kass’ signature glove has pockets on the back; ideal for stashing handwarmers, loose change or whatever other substance Danny might have had in mind when designing these… The lining is also the comfiest of all the ones we tried.

Cons: While they boast waterproof inserts, the camo material on the outer shell isn’t quite as tough against the elements as some of its rivals.