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Billy Morgan with a textbook backside triple cork, but what does that mean?! Photo: Ed Blomfield

Watching a present day slopestyle competition can be a bit bewildering; lots of weird terms like hardway (it all looks kinda hard), regular and switch blend into one and the same, and that's before we even get to the jumps!

When the riders are in the air is when it gets really confusing; spinning and flipping all over the place. The triple cork is definitely the worst offender, dizzying and bewildering to behold, but what is a triple?

'Triple cork' is a broad term, it's used for any trick where a riders head dips below his feet thrice in one air. Easy, but there are many variations, all invented (discovered?) in the last three years or so. With the slopestyle qualifiers kicking off tomorrow,here's a handy run down of the ones you may see in Sochi.

[part title="Frontside Triple Cork 1440"]

Take off: Regular

Land: Regular

Horizontal Rotations: 4

Chances of being seen in Sochi?: Slim

The first, and some say the best, Torstein Horgmo landed this beast in June 2010 to international acclaim/outrage.

Frontside basically means opening your chest out to the direction you're travelling as you rotate off the jump.

Since the original version though no ones seemed to have attempted another and it looks unlikely that this will make an appearance in Sochi, unlike its backside cousin, read on for more info...

[part title="Backside Triple Cork 1440"]

TAKE OFF: REGULAR

LAND: REGULAR

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 4

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: Will be seen

The second triple to be landed, this time by Mark McMorris. It seems like this one is the 'easiest' out of the bunch, with multiple riders throwing it in slopestyle now. Billy Morgan, Mark McMorris and Max Parrot amongst others all seem to have it on lock, so watch out for it!

It's essentially the same as the frontside triple, but with the rider turning away from the direction of travel upon take-off. It has the advantage where the landing is more easily spotted before touching down.

[part title="Backside Triple Cork 1620"]

TAKE OFF: REGULAR

LAND: Switch

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 4 1/2

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: Maybe...

You can catch this one towards the end of the above video, newly qualified Torgeir Bergrem being the first to nail this one. The same as the backside trip 14 but with another 180 thrown in at the end, this ups the technicality as it ends up with the riders landing blind.

No one's managed to land this in a slopestyle comp yet, but Max Parrot and Yuki Kadono both put it down in the X Games Big air last month. Bergrem has also promised he'll attempt it in Sochi so this could be the one that wins...

[part title="Cab Triple Under Flip"]

TAKE OFF: Switch

LAND: Regular

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 1/2

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: Probably

This is one of the 'simpler' triples, especially when it comes to watching it. The rider takes off switch, turns to face down the hill then performs three backflips before riding out regular.

This is the first triple in the back-to-back runs that both Billy Morgan and Max Parrot have put down already. It's likely that if they're throwing cab doubles into a triple in their initial runs they'll try and up their score later on with this.

[part title="Cab Triple Under Flip 1440"]

TAKE OFF: SWITCH

LAND: Switch

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 1

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: Unlikely, but a possibility

Again, the same as the last trick but with an extra 180 thrown in at the end. This also made its competition debut in Aspen last month, but the chances of the standard being upped so much at Sochi that the guys have to start attempting this are pretty slim.

[part title="Backside Triple Rodeo"]

TAKE OFF: Regular

LAND: SWITCH

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 1/2

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: None

Our very own Billy Morgan was the first, and only, rider to land this one, but even he is wary to go back again. One of the riskiest triples as you have to chuck three backflips before tucking in a backside 180, any under or over-rotating and your toast. We're pretty confident we won't see this in Sochi.

[part title="Triple Wildcat"]

TAKE OFF: REGULAR

LAND: Regular

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: None

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: NOpe

In the weird world of snowboard fashion taking off and spinning wildly like a top is cool and doing three straight backflips gets a weary head shake. More of a backcountry trick, Kevin Jones was the first to nail it but Jake Koia's attempt above is a bit more amusing, we think.

[part title="Triple Frontside Rodeo 1440"]

TAKE OFF: REGULAR, Off the toes

LAND: REGULAR

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 4

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: Very Slim

This is one of our favourite trips, first done by Jørn Simen Aabøe. As mega spin-wizzles go, this is pretty creative and takes the 'todeo' to its logical extreme.

Carve up the take off as if you were going to spin backside, but then at the last second throw yourself forward and the other way. Then hold on until you touch down.

[part title="The Concussed Torstein Triple"]

TAKE OFF: Switch

LAND: REGULAR

HORIZONTAL ROTATIONS: 1/2

CHANCES OF BEING SEEN IN SOCHI?: Nil

To land this, first concuss yourself, take of switch when you meant to try in regs, realise you've done it wrong then chuck a half cab into a triple wildcat. Claim it then hurl your helmet into an onlooking fans face at full pelt.

The original competition triple and, in our eyes, still one of the best. Thanks Torstein.